Old-Fashioned Ice Cream Recipes

Recipes from 1913


ice cream recipes

 

CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream

1 pint of milk

1/2 pound of sugar

4 ounces of chocolate

1 teaspoonful of vanilla or 1/4 of a vanilla bean

1/4 of a teaspoonful of cinnamon

Grate the chocolate, put it in a double boiler with the milk; stir until hot, and add the sugar, vanilla, cinnamon and one pint of the cream. When cold, freeze; when frozen, stir in the remaining pint of the cream whipped to a stiff froth.

This will serve ten persons.

 

ice cream COFFEE ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream

1/2 pound of sugar

4 ounces of so-called Mocha coffee 

Grind the Mocha rather coarse; put it in the double boiler with one half the cream, and steep for at least ten minutes. Strain through a fine muslin or flannel bag, pressing it hard to get out all the strength of the coffee. Add the sugar and stir until dissolved; when cold, add the remaining pint of cream and freeze.

This will serve six persons.

 

ORANGE ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream

10 ounces of sugar

Juice of 6 large oranges

Grated rind of one orange

Put the sugar, grated yellow rind of the orange and half the cream in a double boiler over the fire; when the sugar is dissolved, take from the fire, and, when very cold, add the remaining cream, and freeze. When frozen rather hard, add the orange juice, refreeze, and pack to ripen.

 

ice cream GINGER ICE CREAM

1 quart of cream

1/4 pound of preserved ginger

1/2 pound of sugar

1 tablespoonful of lemon juice

Put the ginger through an ordinary meat chopper. Heat the sugar, ginger and half the cream in a double boiler; when the sugar is dissolved, take it from the fire, and, when cold, add the lemon juice and remaining cream, and freeze.

 

Sauces for Ice Cream

 

MAPLE SAUCE

1 cupful of sugar

1 teaspoonful of lemon juice

1 cupful of water

1 teaspoonful of maple flavoring

Put half the sugar in a saucepan and stand it over the fire until it melts and browns, quickly add the water, the remaining sugar and the lemon juice, and boil for about two minutes; take from the fire and add the flavoring. This may be served plain, or with chopped fruit or nuts added.

 

HOT CHOCOLATE SAUCE

ice cream 1/2 cupful of cream or condensed milk

2 ounces of chocolate

1 cupful of sugar

1 teaspoonful of vanilla

Put all the ingredients into a saucepan and stir over the fire until they reach boiling point, boil until the mixture slightly hardens when dropped into cold water. Add the vanilla, turn at once into the sauceboat and send to the table. This must be sufficiently thin to dip nicely over the ice cream.

 

NUT SAUCE

1 cupful of sugar

1/2 cupful of chopped nuts

1 cupful of water

1 teaspoonful of caramel

2 teaspoonfuls of sherry

Boil the sugar and water with a salt-spoonful of cream of tartar or a teaspoonful of lemon juice for five minutes, take from the fire and add all the other ingredients, and stand aside to cool.

 

walnutsWALNUT SAUCE

Melt maple sugar with a little water, and add to each cupful of syrup a half cupful of chopped black walnuts. Maple syrup may also be used by adding half the quantity of boiling water and the nuts. 

 

MONTROSE SAUCE

1/2 tablespoonful of granulated gelatin

1/4 cupful of sugar

1/2 cupful of milk

1 pint of cream

2 tablespoonfuls of brandy

1 teaspoonful of vanilla

Yolks of 3 eggs

Cover the gelatin with milk, let it soak a half hour, and put it, with the milk, in a double boiler over the fire. Beat the yolks of the eggs and the sugar together, add them to the hot milk, stir about one minute until the mixture begins to thicken, take from the fire, and, when cold, add the vanilla and the brandy, and, if you like it, four tablespoonfuls of sherry.

Stand this aside until very, very cold.

 

ORANGE SAUCE

1/2 pint of orange juice

1/2 pint of water

1/2 cupful of sugar

1 tablespoonful of arrowroot

Whites of three eggs

Add the sugar to the water, and, when boiling hot, add the arrowroot moistened. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth; add gradually the hot mixture, beating all the while. Add the orange juice, beat again. Turn it into a sauceboat and stand aside until very cold.

 

 

Excerpt from: Ice Creams, Water Ices, Frozen Puddings Together with Refreshments for all Social Affairs by Mrs. S. T. Rorer. Arnold and Company, Philadelphia, 1913.

“Currier & Ives” print courtesy of Amanda Lewis.